Have you ever walked out of a parking lot and had to think for a moment because you weren’t sure where you had parked your car?  Or searched the house because you couldn’t find your keys? I know most of us have.  And for a second we usually joke about losing our memories or getting older, but the reality is that most of us lead very busy lives, and we don’t always pay enough attention to the routine tasks we do each day, and occasionally have difficulty remembering where we left our keys (or car).  And that’s perfectly normal, especially as we age.  So how do you distinguish when your level of forgetting is no longer what would be considered normal?  And how difficult must it be to accept that?

Generally speaking, when memory loss or confusion is severe enough to interfere with someone’s ability to work and maintain a social life, it is no longer considered normal age related cognitive changes.  Instead that’s probably the time to consult a neurologist or geriatrician for a closer look.  But the fact that some of these things occasionally happen to all of us, ironically feeds denial, both on the part of the person living with dementia, and their family members.  Luckily, education and support are available, both one -on-one and support groups.  Support groups are offered through the Alzheimer’s Association, as well as through many memory care communities and adult day treatment programs.

In the meantime, if you would like to better understand how it feels to be someone living with dementia, pick up a copy of Still Alice, by Lisa Genova.  It is a really quick read that paints quite a vivid picture.

Pulling out my copy,

Lynn

EmailPrintFriendlyShare